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Tuesday, April 16, 2013

Euro Bro No Mo'

I miss Europe sometimes bros.

I didn't mention this before, but in addition to the semester that I spent in London in college, I also lived abroad for about 14 months last year.





And even though I never truly felt anonymous over there—I regularly ran into other Americans, some of whom were connected to people I knew in some way—it did feel nice to disconnect from the whole rat race here. People over there tend to actually enjoy their lives on a daily basis. You'll almost never see people eat or drinking "on the go" there, and work hours and vacation time is more reasonable. Here it feels like the majority of people strongly dislike their jobs, and spend much of their time waiting for the day/week/year to be over. What a fucked up way to live your life. 

Some of you are probably thinking: "Yeah, and look where that lifestyle got Europe!" It's true that some of the European countries are suffering from a general lack of productivity or industry, but look at countries like Germany or Norway, who are killing it: they are very productive and enjoy high qualities of life.

It's often just assumed that the US is kind of the place to be—even by many Europeans. When I told people that I had come from New York many just looked it me like "Why they hell would you ever leave?" I won't get into the answer to that question, as I've already talked about that to some extent.
In the end, I think coming back was the right decision. But that doesn't mean that it was an easy decision or that I don't regularly miss life over there. Living in a foreign place just makes every day more interesting, especially if you are traveling somewhere that people don't speak English. It seems like many people, including a good portion of my friends, imagine this as stressful and unpleasant, but I thought it was sweet. Suddenly going to buy groceries isn't so boring anymore. 

So many Americans just get locked into this soul-crushing grind of getting into debt, working some menial job, and buying shit they don't actually care about. There are definitely some services and material items that I appreciate here, but it's still a huge list of pros and cons. The weirdest part is how blind most people are to it. Even people who have studied abroad often don't notice that there are other ways to live life beside the stereotypical American way. 

I acknowledge that I was damn lucky to have been born into the situation I am in, but that doesn't necessarily make choosing a direction any easier. Plus I got this whole non hetero thing.

Speaking of NHs, it actually seems like many non heteros try especially hard to be awesome in the stereotypical American way—in a "try not respecting who I am when I'm a bigshot lawyer/banker/rich guy/whatever" -way. I think it does help the overall transition to have non heteros in powerful and/or respected positions, but I have to feel bad for those bros that have been rendered so insecure by society's judgement of their orientation.

Bros can look at Italian fountains too ya know

Just some food for thought. Some thoughts to eat. Mmmm Thoughts.

Live yo' lives and live 'em well, bros. 


1 comment:

  1. I totally get all of that dude. I miss being in Europe as well. The lifestyle is massivley different. I also found that people tend to be much more social, and the culture there is a lot more social as well, and people like to go out for the sake of going out. It's something they do as part of their everyday life, as opposed to something they have to 'wait for' at the end of the week. Totally true that Europe is an economic fucking mess, and I'm not really surprised at all, but messes are nothing new in Europe, people move along anyway and do what they always do; chill. I've never spent enough time in the States to compare it to Europe, but I imagine Australia would be very similar to the States. I hear foreigners say they think Australia is a very relaxed and chill place, but compared to Europe, I find it to be a massive rat race, as you so eloquently put it. I admit, I am a Europhile. I miss it every day.

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